Archive for 2017- Page 10

    • Experts question new Chicago graduation requirements

      (Ill.) A new plan to better prepare students in Chicago Public Schools for life after graduation has education experts concerned that the initiative, while well-meaning, may prove half-baked unless the district can provide support resources.

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    • Grants bring high-tech strategy to teacher recruitment

      (Calif.) To help relieve the state’s stubborn teacher shortage, the Tulare County Office of Education is building a digital outreach campaign that, among other things, will utilize mobile avatars to carry recruitment messages.

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    • Growing number of schools move toward solar power

      (District of Columbia) Districts are switching to solar power at a drastically increasing rate and enjoying long-term cost-savings, but solar energy nationally remains an underutilized resource in schools, according to a new study.

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    • CA’s volatile revenues have added confusion to the mix

      (Calif.) Capitol insiders and fiscal managers across the state are beginning to watch with some trepidation the daily tax income reports from the state controller’s office—running about $600 million behind projections made last July.

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    • Kids of hi-tech immigrants dominate science contest

      (Va.) Three quarters of the 2016 finalists in the nation’s most prestigious science competitions for high school students were children of workers in the U.S. on temporary high-skilled employment visas.

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    • National implications of CA consent decree

      In the form of a federal court order, California is leading the way in special education with a lesson that is a warning to the rest of the nation–do your due diligence in finding then supporting students with disabilities.

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    • News analysis: LCFF can’t fix schools by itself

      (Calif.) A report out last week from the Education Trust-West once again raised the thorny issue of whether state funding aimed at disadvantaged students can or should be used to pay teacher salaries and benefits.

      (Editor's note) This story has been updated to include public comment.

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    • Puppy love on campus helping kids cope with daily stress

      (Calif.) Students stressed out over impending college acceptance and rejection letters drop by a teacher’s class to spend time brushing the therapy dog in her class just to calm their nerves.

      At another campus, a first grader practices reading aloud while absentmindedly playing with the ears of a therapy dog that visits his class once a week.

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    • Preparing for literally nothing

      It’s doubtful that President Trump’s proposal drastically reducing next year’s education funding will be fully embraced by Congress. Nevertheless, in your planning it would be best to adopt the ancient axiom of prudent budgeting: “Plan for the worst, hope for the best.”

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    • New bill would make willful defiance a thing of the past

      (Calif.) Schools will no longer be able to suspend or expel any student for willful defiance no matter their age under a bill that moved out of the Senate education committee Wednesday.

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