Archive for 2017

    • More refugee funding under consideration for May revise

      (Calif.) School districts facing significant increases in the number of new refugee students could receive $5 million in one-time Proposition 98 funding under a proposal considered Tuesday by key legislative panel.

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    • Children big losers in House health care rewrite

      (District of Columbia) Legislation to repeal and replace Obamacare could have resulted in the elimination of benefits to millions of low-income children, shifting some of those services to schools, according to analysis from a national advocacy group.

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    • LEAs needed fewer waiver requests in 2016

      (Calif.) School districts requested less than 300 waivers last year from state education requirements, continuing a four-year trend, according to a new report from the California Department of Education.

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    • States continue move away from Common Core tests

      (R.I.) Rhode Island will become the latest in a growing list of states to drop its national consortium designed assessment in favor of using a college-readiness exam to meet federal accountability requirements, education officials announced last week.

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    • Avoid the hidden hurdles in disability identification

      With kindergarten round-ups, tri-annuals, and the rush of third quarter initial referrals, spring is a kind of peak season for eligibility decisions. Being savvy about potential pitfalls will make for more accurate diagnoses and due diligence in finding students with disabilities.

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    • Funding reform bill leads Texas leg action

      (Texas) A sweeping overhaul of the school funding system won approval last week from the Legislature’s lower house with bipartisan support, but still faces an uncertain future in the state Senate.

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    • Charters vs. CTA heads for Capitol showdown

      (Calif.) The growing struggle between charter schools and opponents within the traditional system will spill into legislative chambers this week as lawmakers consider several bills that would put new regulations on charters and their operators.

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    • New bills take on start times, IEP translation and fake news

      (Calif.) Middle and high schools will be prohibited from starting the regular school day before 8:30 a.m. under a bill at the center of a heated debate Wednesday during a Senate Education Committee hearing.

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    • Re-emphasizing the Title IX imperative

      Allegations against celebrities along with a recent resolution agreement between a California district and the U.S. Department of Education Office of Civil Rights should be stark reminders that schools must be vigilant about policies and practices regarding harassment and hostile environments.

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    • New concerns over another of Brown’s online learning ideas

      (Calif.) The non-partisan Legislative Analyst urged lawmakers Tuesday to reject a proposal from the governor to double the state’s ongoing support for online education at community colleges to $20 million annually.

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