Archive for November 2014 - Page 3

    • GOP sweep includes state school superintendent races

      (Wyo.) The Republican red tide that swept Congress Tuesday night also offered coattails to GOP candidates running for education chief in several states – almost all of whom used strong opposition to the Common Core State Standards as a key platform.

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    • School bonds still a voter favorite

      A cursory glance at early election results Wednesday showed voters in a dozen districts from Pasadena to National City approved the sale of more than $500 million in bonds to repair, replace and equip aging school facilities for the future.

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    • Torlakson surges to big win; voters back rainy day fund

      (Calif.) Incumbent Tom Torlakson won a clear victory Tuesday for a second term as leader of the nation’s largest public school system, besting charter school advocate Marshall Tuck by more than 180,000 votes.

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    • Managing out of district and non-public school placements

      Local education agency administrators who are truly committed to the concept of least restrictive environment will strive to minimize the number of students who are placed in regional programs or non-public schools.

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    • Crisis brewing among early learners

      (Miss.) Superintendent Carey Wright is a staunch advocate of early childhood education but her mission to improve these programs for Mississippi kids has taken on new urgency in the wake of the state’s first assessment of kindergarten readiness.

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    • Analysis: national press misreads schools chief battle

      (Calif.) California readers of the New York Times may have been surprised to learn over the weekend that the contest for superintendent of schools was drawing more attention outside the state than from within.

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    • Fight over history frameworks moves to Tennessee

      (Tenn.) The state board of education last week refused to adopt a resolution denouncing a new national U.S. history course, making Tennessee the latest state to become embroiled in controversy over what students should be taught about America’s past.

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    • Prioritize least restrictive environment by setting goals

      By determining benchmarks then consistently measuring progress, teachers and administrators alike can meet their legal and ethical obligations for serving students with disabilities in the least restrictive environment (LRE).

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    • LEA settles equal access issue to advanced learning

      (N.J.) Despite its location within one of the most racially diverse regions of the country, the School District of South Orange and Maplewood moved this week to settle claims that black students were not receiving equal access to advanced learning opportunities.

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    • ‘Redskin’ hullabaloo won’t change student press limits

      (Calif.) A heated dispute between student journalists and their high school administration over use of the word “Redskins” has drawn national headlines, but legal experts say the case isn’t likely to spark much change in First Amendment rights within public schools.

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