Archive for November 2014 - Page 2

    • Work starts on school performance measures

      (Calif.) A year after the state allocated the first money under the Local Control Funding Formula and four months after schools adopted their first accountability plans – work has begun in earnest on a new system for measuring school performance.

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    • Appellate court considers special ed qualifications

      (Idaho) The case of an Idaho teen with Asperger syndrome set to be heard by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals -- appears certain to test public schools’ obligation to provide special education services.

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    • Counselors provide needed boost to readiness

      (Colo.) The state's School Counselor Corps grant program – which until this year received $5 million annually – has proven so successful that Gov. John Hickenlooper agreed to a near doubling to $8 million and to widening eligibility to every middle- and high school in the state.

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    • Weary march into Corrective Action continues in CA

      (Calif.) The confused and complex landscape surrounding school accountability in California is set to take one more step deeper into the abyss with formal designation this week of another cohort of districts deemed to be failing under the No Child Left Act.

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    • Teachers and students getting left behind by technology

      (N.Y.) The difference between what teachers and pupils know about new technology could be detrimental to student learning if schools don’t properly prepare educators to keep up, according to a new whitepaper released last week.

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    • New health mandates pose problems in the field

      (Calif.) As school district officials work to comply with the Legislature’s annual onslaught of new education laws, two health-related mandates are causing particular concerns for those charged with carrying out new eye testing and issuing protocols for anaphylactic shock treatment.

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    • GOP sweep includes state school superintendent races

      (Wyo.) The Republican red tide that swept Congress Tuesday night also offered coattails to GOP candidates running for education chief in several states – almost all of whom used strong opposition to the Common Core State Standards as a key platform.

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    • School bonds still a voter favorite

      A cursory glance at early election results Wednesday showed voters in a dozen districts from Pasadena to National City approved the sale of more than $500 million in bonds to repair, replace and equip aging school facilities for the future.

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    • Torlakson surges to big win; voters back rainy day fund

      (Calif.) Incumbent Tom Torlakson won a clear victory Tuesday for a second term as leader of the nation’s largest public school system, besting charter school advocate Marshall Tuck by more than 180,000 votes.

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    • Crisis brewing among early learners

      (Miss.) Superintendent Carey Wright is a staunch advocate of early childhood education but her mission to improve these programs for Mississippi kids has taken on new urgency in the wake of the state’s first assessment of kindergarten readiness.

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