Archive for November 2014 - Page 2

    • Grad rate of special ed students continues climb

      (Calif.) Performance of the state’s 700,000 special education students continues to improve, registering a high school graduation rate of nearly 62 percent continuing a five-year trend.

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    • Deconstructing classroom seating

      (Mich.) Students file into a classroom and begin sinking into bean bag chairs, bouncing lightly on yoga balls or standing at tall tables. Relaxed environments like this – known as active classrooms - are quickly springing up across the country, replacing the standard, formalized setting.

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    • Work starts on school performance measures

      (Calif.) A year after the state allocated the first money under the Local Control Funding Formula and four months after schools adopted their first accountability plans – work has begun in earnest on a new system for measuring school performance.

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    • Appellate court considers special ed qualifications

      (Idaho) The case of an Idaho teen with Asperger syndrome set to be heard by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals -- appears certain to test public schools’ obligation to provide special education services.

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    • Managing student transfers from contracted to district operated classes

      Any reduction in contracted instructional programs will require a commensurate increase in classrooms directly operated by the local education agency. The necessary transitions must be judiciously handled by program managers.

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    • Counselors provide needed boost to readiness

      (Colo.) The state's School Counselor Corps grant program – which until this year received $5 million annually – has proven so successful that Gov. John Hickenlooper agreed to a near doubling to $8 million and to widening eligibility to every middle- and high school in the state.

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    • Weary march into Corrective Action continues in CA

      (Calif.) The confused and complex landscape surrounding school accountability in California is set to take one more step deeper into the abyss with formal designation this week of another cohort of districts deemed to be failing under the No Child Left Act.

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    • Teachers and students getting left behind by technology

      (N.Y.) The difference between what teachers and pupils know about new technology could be detrimental to student learning if schools don’t properly prepare educators to keep up, according to a new whitepaper released last week.

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    • Reducing contracting by judicious administration of specialized classes

      Offering the fullest possible spectrum of classes necessary for placements in least restrictive environments requires sophisticated district programs to replace contracted services, a project that is daunting yet absolutely necessary. 

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    • New health mandates pose problems in the field

      (Calif.) As school district officials work to comply with the Legislature’s annual onslaught of new education laws, two health-related mandates are causing particular concerns for those charged with carrying out new eye testing and issuing protocols for anaphylactic shock treatment.

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