Archive for July 2014

    • Youth suicide stats prompt call for awareness training

      (Calif.) There are over 11,000 suicide attempts by youth in California each year - nearly 30 every day - and about 172 of those results in death. Experts believe these statistics could be lower if school staff were properly trained on how to recognize and deal with suicidal youth.

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    • Federal jobs bill offers K-12 partnership grants

      (Ohio) A Toledo high school that partners with regional industry to help train students for employment was visited this week by two of President Barack Obama’s senior cabinet officials to highlight the type of successful job-training programs envisioned under new federal law.

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    • New dispute opens over LCAP reporting mandate

      (Calif.) A festering dispute over how much freedom local officials should have over education spending has reignited, pitting school managers against advocates for low-income families and some key members of the Legislature.

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    • California joins states urging student-led voter drives

      (Calif.) One of a handful of states working to increase voter registration in the 18 to 24-year old age group, California passed a new law expanding regulations for student-led voter registration drives on high school campuses.

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    • Online instruction might serve sex ed best

      (Chicago, Ill.) Not surprisingly, for teenagers with questions about sex, birth control and sexually transmitted diseases or related issues there are digital resources they can access on their own for answers.

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    • Deep tax cuts threaten Kansas schools and Gov.’s re-election

      (Kan.) Nearly a decade has passed since a landmark ruling determined lawmakers were inadequately funding public schools – but the promise of those extra dollars may be as elusive as ever.

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    • New tool for navigating federal privacy laws

      (District of Columbia) A recent cyberattack that sent one school district’s field test of a new online state assessment into a tailspin earlier this year was enough to strike panic into the hearts of school district administrators everywhere.  If malfeasance can disrupt the flow of internet traffic during a critical testing window, could it also steal private student data, tamper with transcripts, or take down a district’s entire network?

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    • Researchers find grim employment status for teachers

      (District of Columbia) Much of the disproportionally high rate of teacher turnover in hard-to-staff schools serving high-poverty students can be attributed to a lack of quality induction programs for beginning teachers, according to guidance released earlier this month.

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    • Child immigrants unlikely to flood any one school district

      (District of Columbia) Despite growing concerns that the influx of unaccompanied child immigrants into the U.S. will overwhelm local government services in some communities, social advocates say public schools are not likely to be part of that turmoil.

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    • Speech therapy rebooted by use of online resource

      (Calif.) Online speech therapy, once less favored than in-person treatment, is becoming a more commonly used resource as districts struggle to find and afford qualified speech-language therapists.

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