Archive for May 2014 - Page 2

    • No money for accurate count of childcare needs

      (Calif.) Legislative leaders have decided to delay at least another year efforts to restore a mere $8 million needed to provide an accurate count of the state’s unmet childcare and preschool needs.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Schools get time to noodle with whole grain options

      (District of Columbia) Schools that can demonstrate significant challenges in serving whole-grain rich pastas are receiving some leeway from the U.S. Department of Agriculture over the next two years.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Lawmaker: Time to restore support for school nurses

      (Calif.) After years of budget cuts, California has one of the highest student-to-nurse ratios in the nation at 2,700 to one. but now, with economic conditions improving and revenue on the rise, a California lawmaker wants every school district receiving extra cash for disadvantaged students under the state’s new funding system to hire a nurse.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Interest grows in schools where teachers run the show

      (Minn.) With more than 60 so-called 'teacher-powered' schools operating in 15 states, charter advocates in search of new models of success tout in a new policy brief the growing interest nationally in schools designed and run exclusively by teachers.

      CONTINUE READING
    • As reading scores climb overall, gap persists

      (Calif.) Despite higher reading scores in classrooms across the nation, the achievement gap between white, black and Hispanic youth has seen very little improvement according to a report released last week by Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization that monitors how children and teens use media.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Test consortium offers work readiness tool

      (Olympia, Wash.) A new tool designed to help districts prepare students for jobs following graduation has been released by the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Tech giants lobby for elevation of code study

      (Calif.) It is a digital world – every facet of daily life is connected in some way by devices, apps and programs. Yet in 30 states including high tech champion California -- computer science courses can’t count as a math or science credit toward high school graduation requirements.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Long-shot bid for SPI tied to Common Core

      (Calif.) Like many conservatives, Lydia Gutierrez is opposed to the new national curriculum standards – but the 56-year-old Republican is the only one of them running for state schools chief.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Aligning common core with common sense

      Testing based on Common Core State Standards may well be the most ambitious national reform in the history of performance measurement but there is a growing misconception among educators that it will accurately gage the progress of all students.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Feds remind charters of civil rights obligations

      (District of Columbia) Despite the claims of some critics that charter schools are largely unaccountable to key education mandates, the U.S. Department of Education issued clear notice this week that federal civil rights protections apply to all public schools.

      CONTINUE READING