Archive for February 2014

    • Lawmakers would mandate ‘holistic’ education

      (Calif.) There’s plenty of research to suggest that a more holistic approach to education – that is, looking beyond a pupil’s academic needs to emotional, social and medical conditions as well – would likely lead to greater all-around success for individual students.

      One California senator would like the state to fund a new K-12 pilot program that would prove the theory correct by linking special education, mental health and school climate services under one roof.

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    • Win admission lottery, get diploma, be college ready

      (N.Y.) The disappointment of not being accepted to a school of choice can be difficult for some students to get over – but are the implications more serious? Can losing an admission lottery impact graduation rates and college readiness?

      Turns out it can, at least according to new research from the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences.

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    • Funding dispute threatens health, counseling program

      (Calif.) School nurses, speech pathologists, counselors and psychologists throughout California face pink slips this spring as districts struggled to close a $600 million gap created by a withholding of federal funds.

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    • Feds offer guide to protecting student privacy

      (District of Columbia) The U.S. Department of Education released new guidance Tuesday to help schools cope with a variety of competing demands surrounding online education services and student privacy.

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    • Call to fix or phase out school transportation

      (Calif.) With the Legislature set to tackle a remake of California’s 67-year-old school transportation funding system, the Legislative Analyst on Tuesday offered up three options ranging from a complete phase-out of the program to covering an increased share of reimbursement costs for districts receiving less than the state average.

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    • Specific Learning Disabilities –  What we don’t know has hurt us

      For anyone who has been involved in special education as a practitioner or policy maker for more than, say, 10 minutes, the term “specific learning disability” must have an odd connotation because there is nothing “specific” about the diagnosis.

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    • Underage winemakers seek alcohol exception

      (Calif.) Most policies dealing with alcohol consumption by underage students focus on keeping the two apart. But under a new bill introduced by North Coast Assemblyman Wes Chesbro (D-Arcata), students 18 and over would be free to taste the alcoholic beverages they’re crafting in pursuit of a college wine- or beer-making degree.   

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    • Bipartisan effort to restore school bus funding

      (Calif.) School districts could see significant increases in funding for transportation costs if either of two separate Senate proposals introduced this week ends up as law.

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    • Bush legacy propels Florida’s digital learning leadership

      (Fla.) Florida may not spring to mind as an incubator of cutting edge technology, but the next generation of the nation’s most digitally-savvy denizens may in fact hail from the Sunshine State thanks to recently-adopted legislation that puts the state among the frontrunners of virtual learning.

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    • Spring testing brings out protests and tin foil

      (Mo.)  With a large number of states set later this spring to launch some form of new testing based on the Common Core State Standards, partisans on either side are taking some extreme positions.

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