Archive for January 2015 - Page 3

    • Ag education joins STEM wave

      (Mich.) Although schools focused primarily on science, technology, engineering and mathematics have gained popularity nationwide in recent years, one district in the rural community of St. Johns is beginning to infuse an agricultural twist into the subjects.

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    • Budget leaves facilities crisis for another day

      (Calif.) Despite signals that his administration was ready to undertake a sweeping change for how new schools are paid for and older ones updated, Gov. Jerry Brown unveiled Friday a far less substantial facilities program, pushing the larger policy debate off for another time.

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    • Wellness survey proves a good resource for LCAP needs

      (Calif.) For years, schools throughout the nation collected realms of data on student drug use and other risky behavior only to set the program aside when federal funding for the effort was cut during the recession. Now the healthy student survey is making a comeback as an important LCFF resource. 

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    • The Bay State explores new ways to make up snow days

      (Mass.) Traditionally, schools in colder parts of the country made up days cancelled due to inclement weather by simply adding on to the school year. Now, one district may instead begin reclaiming lost learning time by allowing teachers to assign additional projects.

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    • Top education issues for the rest of the decade

      We are midway through the second decade of the second modern millennium so it is time to set our sights on what we can do to truly make our schools vital and relevant – not just through legislation but in purpose and policy. Here’s a list of 10 issues that need our attention. And yes, the order is relevant.

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    • School testing gets a bit of state support

      (Calif.) It may not be much, but school districts will be reimbursed some $12.3 million to help offset costs associated with administering the state’s new Common Core-aligned, digital student assessments, set for official rollout this spring.

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    • Teacher pensions balloon from final year pay raise

      (District of Columbia) Rather than increasing the retirement contributions from school districts and their employees, states should consider restrictions on big pay raises to veteran teachers as a better means of controlling pension costs, according to new research from Georgetown University.

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    • Brown’s budget would add billions to K-12 funding

      (Calif.) Public schools got a glimpse into their ever-brightening financial futures on Monday when Gov. Jerry Brown, in his inaugural speech, announced they will receive $65.7 billion next year.

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    • Voluntary enrollment key to offering single-sex classes

      (District of Columbia) With a resurgence in single-sex education, federal officials have issued guidance reminding school managers that a parent’s decision to place students in classes where boys and girls are taught separately must be completely voluntary.

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    • New school performance model takes shape

      (Calif.) Top education officials this month are expected to sign off on a plan that dramatically changes the way public school performance is measured, away from the single-number ranking system that exists now to a mix of more interpretive data being generated through the state's new K-12 funding model.

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