Archive for October 2017

    • Student-led lessons not stalled by lack of strong vocab

      (Texas) Latino children’s perceived lack of vocabulary is causing teachers to shy away from the type of lessons that actually improve vocabulary by emphasizing students’ individuality, a new report finds.

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    • Due process safeguards for chronic absenteeism

      Like their classmates, students with disabilities sometimes have a challenge getting to school, and administrators need to keep an eye out for those with excessive absences. All states have compulsory attendance laws which apply to SWD as well, but when it comes time to consider imposing sanctions on a special education student that has missed too school—care needs to be taken.

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    • Setting cut scores for English learners

      (Calif.) Work begins this month on a key step in updating the state’s efforts to teach English to some 1.3 million students who speak a foreign language at home.

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    • States slowly embrace mandatory recess

      (Mass.) Massachusetts could become one of only seven states to require that schools set aside time in the day to ensure all students have recess under legislation awaiting the governor’s signature.

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    • Critical thinking as a performance indicator

      With standardized test scores no longer the ‘be all-end all’ in regard to accountability, we must take time to determine how best to augment performance indicators, and what that will mean for teaching.

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    • Metal detectors scrutinized by L.A. student groups

      (Calif.) The use of metal detectors and random searches has again come into question as students groups and equal rights organizations called this week on Los Angeles Unified to drop the policy, which they argued is ineffective and reliant on racial profiling.

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    • Removal of IDEA guidance gives DeVos new headache

      (District of Columbia) U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has entangled herself in yet another policy dustup, but this time the adversary carries potent political muscle—families of students with disabilities.

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    • New EMT pathway tackles student and community needs

      (Ohio) This spring, more than a dozen Toledo, high school students will graduate poised to earn an emergency medical technician credential under a new career education pathway that can lead to a job with local fire departments.

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    • LEAs can consider more than price in food service contracts

      (Calif.) New legislation signed by Gov. Jerry Brown will allow school cafeterias to donate leftover food to charity, resolve conflicts with federal law over food service contracts, and qualify nearly 400,000 more K-12 students for free and reduced-price meals.

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    • Brown uses red ink to veto ed bills

      (Calif.) While Gov. Jerry Brown applied his signature to scores of bills impacting K-12 schools this fall, he also used the power of the veto to send others back—among them, a grant program aimed at improving reading skills among third graders.

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